The Arc Series (2009 - present)

Multiple locations

Materials vary

Arc One (2009 Lake Tyrell, Victoria) was originally set up as a 100m long gentle arc of rope-light, cutting across the surface of the salt lake. It was left for nearly a month for the lake’s tidal energy to create new forms and encrust with salt – becoming a part of the landscape itself.

Arc Two (2010 Death Valley, California) using flashlights with a focused beam, spread over a distance of about 25m across the Mesquite Sand Dunes, the piece captures the movement of the sand blowing over the dunes. Originally intended to produce a curved wall of light the predicted sand storm sadly didn’t happen so the cast light was only visible up to about 50cm about each flashlight.

The shape of the arc was created by the wind, blowing against string used to mark the course of the arc.

Arc Three (2010 Odeceixe, Portugal) carved into a curved rock wall the piece balances out the natural curve of the landscape. An unfinished piece, originally intended to be lit from within in such a way that the slit appears convex, in juxtaposition to the concave face.

The rock was far too crumbly to carve deeply and accurately enough to finish the piece.

Arc Four (2011 Kinglake, Victoria)  uses the light of the space, rather than an introduced light source, as it reflects off a 30m long curved mirror. The arc curves both horizontally and vertically to create the impression it continues into the ground.

Arc Five (2011- Woodend, Victoria)  map a direct response to the site, using only materials found at the site. A 50m long curved wall of felled timber. As yet unfinished, the final stage of the piece will be represented by the timber’s absense, as it will leave a curved depression of mould on the forest floor by preventing light and air reaching the ground at its foundation. The piece has been deteriorating since its installation and will be ready for removal soon

Arc Six (2012 – 2013) An underwater arc that barely exists by manipulating the reflection of light off the surface of a body of water. Originally installed as a trial run in a pond behind the Falls Creek Ski Resort, the work required a more constant and higher volume source of air. A revisit of the work was temporarily installed in a pond at the Toyota Corporate Headquarters in Port Melbourne in 2014.

Arc Seven – still only a prototype, using a curved light source, reflected in the water below. The idealised arc sits above while the imperfect arc, below is nature’s intervention. A plan to build a larger, room sized version that ripples with the footsteps of the viewer is underway.

Arc Eight (Vertice)  contrasts the finite with the infinite. A seemingly diminutive room is installed in the Atrium within the Incinerator Gallery, extending from the front window into the main gallery space.  Its fixed dimensions belie the experience of entering and finding a boundless line of light that pierces the vertical limits of the space. Arc Eight reinvents the infinity room aesthetic by creating a reductive yet profound perceptual experience

Arc Nine (Shimmering Arc ) – A private commission for a beautiful residential garden in Melbourne, Shimmering Arc is comprised of sixty hand-cast resin fins, embedded with lengths of mirror and lit from beneath. It is designed to be just as effective as a daylight piece, reflecting the skies above the opposite house in the darkened space of the garden.

Arc ZERO – Nimbus (2017, Omachi, Japan) Commissioned for the Japan Alps Art Festival, Arc ZERO stands at the entrance to the Buddhist Temple Hotokizaki Kanon-ji. A ring of mist encircles the old bridge, which one must cross through to enter the site. A portal on the threshold of worlds, it represents the cycle of water, and all things in nature. By day the mist creates crepuscular rays and a rainbow effect around the view, while by night the mist is lit from within the structure, blazing a warm glow.

Arc One (2009 Lake Tyrell, Victoria) was originally set up as a 100m long gentle arc of rope-light, cutting across the surface of the salt lake. It was left for nearly a month for the lake’s tidal energy to create new forms and encrust with salt – becoming a part of the landscape itself.

Arc Two (2010 Death Valley, California) using flashlights with a focused beam, spread over a distance of about 25m across the Mesquite Sand Dunes, the piece captures the movement of the sand blowing over the dunes. Originally intended to produce a curved wall of light the predicted sand storm sadly didn’t happen so the cast light was only visible up to about 50cm about each flashlight.

The shape of the arc was created by the wind, blowing against string used to mark the course of the arc.

Arc Three (2010 Odeceixe, Portugal) carved into a curved rock wall the piece balances out the natural curve of the landscape. An unfinished piece, originally intended to be lit from within in such a way that the slit appears convex, in juxtaposition to the concave face.

The rock was far too crumbly to carve deeply and accurately enough to finish the piece.

Arc Four (2011 Kinglake, Victoria)  uses the light of the space, rather than an introduced light source, as it reflects off a 30m long curved mirror. The arc curves both horizontally and vertically to create the impression it continues into the ground.

Arc Five (2011- Woodend, Victoria)  map a direct response to the site, using only materials found at the site. A 50m long curved wall of felled timber. As yet unfinished, the final stage of the piece will be represented by the timber’s absense, as it will leave a curved depression of mould on the forest floor by preventing light and air reaching the ground at its foundation. The piece has been deteriorating since its installation and will be ready for removal soon

Arc Six (2012 – 2013) An underwater arc that barely exists by manipulating the reflection of light off the surface of a body of water. Originally installed as a trial run in a pond behind the Falls Creek Ski Resort, the work required a more constant and higher volume source of air. A revisit of the work was temporarily installed in a pond at the Toyota Corporate Headquarters in Port Melbourne in 2014.

Arc Seven – still only a prototype, using a curved light source, reflected in the water below. The idealised arc sits above while the imperfect arc, below is nature’s intervention. A plan to build a larger, room sized version that ripples with the footsteps of the viewer is underway.

Arc Nine (Shimmering Arc ) – A private commission for a beautiful residential garden in Melbourne, Shimmering Arc is comprised of sixty hand-cast resin fins, embedded with lengths of mirror and lit from beneath. It is designed to be just as effective as a daylight piece, reflecting the skies above the opposite house in the darkened space of the garden.

Arc ZERO – Nimbus (2017, Omachi, Japan) Commissioned for the Japan Alps Art Festival, Arc ZERO stands at the entrance to the Buddhist Temple Hotokizaki Kanon-ji. A ring of mist encircles the old bridge, which one must cross through to enter the site. A portal on the threshold of worlds, it represents the cycle of water, and all things in nature. By day the mist creates crepuscular rays and a rainbow effect around the view, while by night the mist is lit from within the structure, blazing a warm glow.

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